CIU211 – Self-Refection of Creative Project

The following is a critical self-reflection of my creative project in the module CIU211 in my Animation Bachelor’s Degree. I am not criticizing the work of my teammates of this project, and should they be mentioned, it is only to add to the reflection of the project and choices I made during it.

poster_ciu_by_frostieheart-db7djm9

The major project in CIU211 was to propose, and then create, a piece of media, that would then be shared online. The topic of this piece of media had to be related to one of the weekly topics in class, and we could chose any form of media to present it.

I proposed a poster, challenging stereotypes and self-image, having read the lecture on mainstream media. My teammates liked the idea, and we began writing out the proposal for this task. When it was first submitted, our lecturer told us that the plan was vague and needed to be fleshed out, with facts, not just ideas. I had trouble finding the information that I was told I needed from scholarly websites and other reliable sources, I simply had no idea what to search for. My lecturer did however send useful texts that helped a lot.

When it came to creating the actual project, I, as the one who originally proposed the idea, became the project lead of sorts, and I delegated jobs. One of my teammates offered to make the poster, and so I gave her that job whilst myself and our other team member would do whatever other research was needed as well as find images to be placed in our poster. On paper, this was a well thought out plan, however this didn’t work in practice.

I, and I’ve been told that my teammates as well, prioritized Studio 1 (ANI210) over CIU. The studio unit was the bigger one, where there was teammates relying on me for assets, lecturers reminding us of our learning outcomes that we needed to have completed, and the emphasis on doing our mini-specialization projects. As a consequence, there wasn’t as much effort being put into the poster, it had been pushed to the side for assessment in another class. Because of lack of effort, the poster was not as good as it most definitely could have been.

In the last lesson of trimester, the class presented all the projects made, and we all marked each others works. Common comments on this poster were about the lines being too thick, the text not being necessary, the subcultures that we were trying to show not being clear enough. And to this, I completely agree, the lines were too thick, we, my group and I, acknowledged this when it was first posted into our slack channel, but my teammate who was making it said that she couldn’t fix it. I also agree that we probably didn’t need the text there, and it covered up a fair chunk of the image that could have been used as more of the image to help in bringing forth the point. And yes, I agree that the subcultures, and subsequently our main idea, were too hard to make out, there should have been more diversity and difference in each image that was placed in the broken mirror.

One idea suggested in that last class was to create a series of images to help convey our message better. This idea intrigued me, and I believe that it is a good idea, and if we had of had the time, we could have created a series of posters, a set promoting the question of “who do you think you are?” instead of just the single image.

In future I shall try not to present forward half-formed ideas and try to have a more solid idea to work from, or help someone else with their idea and leave my half formed ideas for a later date, at which time they would be better developed.

This ends my critical reflection of my creative project this trimester in CIU211. I hope I didn’t bore you all with this.

~Icetail~

http://frostieheart.deviantart.com/art/Who-Do-You-Think-You-Are-677517201
Also here: http://missjiav.deviantart.com/art/Identity-677532164

Reflective Blog Task – Collaborating With Fans

Blogging my gained knowledge from class is a very interesting thing – something I haven’t really done before. In my final assessment for CIU111 (Overview of Industry) I have to write three reflective blog posts, each one on one of the weekly lectures that we have received in class during this trimester. This post will focus on our lecture two weeks ago, on collaborating with fans.

Related image

Old DA logo

I thoroughly enjoy interacting with other fans of media works that I myself am a fan of, as well as communicating with the fans of my own work, be it fan art/fiction or my own personal stuff. The fans are a large community of people who, for lack of any simpler term, stalk the social media profiles of creators, looking to comment on art, talk with other fans or simply discover the next big project of the creator. There are many places to do this, like blogs, Facebook, Twitter, and my personal favourite at the moment; DeviantArt. The popular art sharing website allows fans to follow each other, and the profiles of any famous artist who has an account, as well as keep track of popular trends in the DeviantArt community, through DA headquarters.

However in the lecture, I took note of three subtitles in particular:

Crowdfunding

Fan Approval

Fan Response

These three titles stood out for different reasons.

Lets start with crowdfunding. I first heard the term when watching a video from YandereDev, talking about his different solutions to speeding up the creation the game currently designated ‘Yandere Simulator’. In this video, YandereDev talks about how he plans on using a crowdfunding service such as the website Kickstarter, a site that is purely for crowdfunding projects. YandereDev’s video was the first time I ever heard the term ‘crowdfunding’. On Google, the definition of crowdfunding is as such – “the practice of funding a project or venture by raising many small amounts of money from a large number of people, typically via the Internet.” At the time that I watched the video from YandereDev I didn’t pay much attention to the term, not really seeing how it related to me. When it was mentioned again in this lecture, I came to realise that crowdfunding is

important-information-barbados-1

With this revelation in play, I paid more attention to what crowd funding is and how it does truly relate to me and the Animation industry, and see it as a future  way to fund projects once I have completed my degree.

yuki_no_hana_cover_by_frostieheart-dagsgv9Fan Approval and Fan Response are things that I have always recognised as important, but not really from a creator’s perspective. Fan approval amongst the fans is heavily based on comments and other responses to the creative works of the fans. I have received my fair share of positive and neutral responses, as well as constructive criticism on my own fanfictions and fanart, as well as an overwhelming amount of no response. As an example of this I shall use my own fan fiction story, Yuki no Hana (translates to; Snow Blossom), which is my current work-in-progress on FanFiction.net. My constant reviewer to this story, presea221, often asks questions in their reviews that make me realise when I have erred in my typing or thought process and had to re-evaluate my story to fit in forgotten points, such as when they brought up a character they couldn’t wait to see and I noticed that I hadn’t planned for that character to show up, even though he was integral to the main plotline.

However in the industry, fan approval and response is quiet different to the interactions between fans. In the lecture I note that fan approval applies to pre-existing media, where a continuation of events in a piece of media is carried onto the next. It gets the audience involved with a media work in a way that brings the final product out in a form that the majority enjoy. Of course, one cannot please everyone, and most of the time there will be at least one person expressing their dislike of a particular aspect of the presented media. This is a part of the ‘fan response’.

wildhammer-fact-checkerFan response isn’t just negative comments however. As stated in the lecture, it is positive feedback, which sometimes can help with the decision making process when working out both where the story goes, and what happens to characters. The fans can also point out discrepancies in stories, like at BlizzCon2010 where someone stood up to point out a problem in the lore which had been overlooked by developers, or they can find bugs and glitches, an example of this being YandereDev who puts out his debug builds to his audience and asks them to email him bugs and glitches with his game, which he then fixes. Blizzard Entertainment, after BlizzCon2010, fixed the lore by putting correct characters in their places and adding an NPC, the Wildhammer Fact Checker, as a reminder to not make the same mistake.

I, too, have also had my own stories thrown into my face (nicely) as reviewers point out problems with my versions of events and where I forgot certain parts of the lore I was already writing around. My unofficial beta reader, Defiance-of-Fate, will often point out mistakes I have made in a chapter before I post when I show him the document from my laptop or Samsung tablet. Defiance-of-Fate and I often go over my chapters before I post them to make sure that I still adhere to the plotline of the game/book/anime that I am writing fanfiction for, as well as not contradicting my own plotlines that I create for my stories.

world_of_warcraft___worgen_warlock_by_sandara-daf35cgThis lecture on ‘Collaborating with Fans’ also assisted me a great deal with my assessment for my CIU210 (Media Studies), where, also two weeks ago, I had to get up in front of the class and give a presentation relating to the weekly lecture for that class. Coincidentally the topic of that lecture was about Audiences, Fans and Fandoms, which had several overlapping points with this class’ lecture. I was able to draw points from this lecture into my presentation, especially when I was discussing fanart contests and events. One particular event that I brought up was the Celebrate the Classes event that happened on DeviantArt on August 19 – 31. The image to the left of this paragraph was commissioned from one of my favourite artists on DeviantArt, by DeviantArt for Blizzard Entertainment for this event.

All up, the lecture on Collaborating with Fans was quite interesting and I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. It drew my attention to terms and services I had previously ignored. Now that I know their use, I shall endeavour to act upon the knowledge.

See you in a few days for my next post!

~Icetail~

References
– About — Kickstarter. Kickstarter.com. Retrieved 1 December 2016, from https://www.kickstarter.com/about?ref=nav
– YandereDev, A. (2016). Yandere Simulator: Past, Present, and Future. YouTube. Retrieved 1 December 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0yXtJuF1SI
– Week 10: Collaborating with Fans – Self-Directed Practitioners. Medium. Retrieved 1 December 2016, from https://medium.com/self-directed-practitioners/week-10-collaborating-with-fans-c2cfff5d64fe#.cmnh2k5mz
 – DeviantArt Headquarters. (2000). DeviantArt. Retrieved 1 December 2016, from http://hq.deviantart.com/
Wildhammer Fact Checker. Wowhead. Retrieved 2 December 2016, from http://www.wowhead.com/npc=51596/wildhammer-fact-checker
– Red Shirt Guy – World of Warcraft Red Shirt – World of Warcraft convention. (2010). YouTube. Retrieved 2 December 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fziRzD05yI 

Reflective Task – Review of Independent Media

The last task for my blog posts in CIU110 is to review a piece of independent media. I chose to review the work-in-progress game “Yandere Simulator” by YandereDev.

yandere sim logo

Before I get into this review I must point out that the game ‘Yandere Simulator’ is in no way complete, as its creator YandereDev continuously points out, what is currently available is a debug sandbox build to allow people to test out the features of this game and report back problems. There is no way to win this game at present.

yandere sim

Yandere-chan

‘Yandere Simulator’ is a work-in-progress game based around the idea of the Japanese character trait of Yandere, who is generally a female character who obsessively loves someone, enough to kill. These characters are deranged and mentally unstable. The main character of Yandere Simulator, currently known as Yandere-chan, or Ayano Aishi, is such a character. She is obsessed with the character who is her Senpai, currently called Taro Yamada. The game revolves around the world of Yandere-chan as the player controls her, trying to win Senpai’s affections by keeping away his other potential girlfriends, who are Yandere-chan’s rivals. YandereDev has stated that the finished game will take place over a time period of ten weeks, with each week having a new rival for Yandere-chan to eliminate. Should the player fail to eliminate the rival before the Friday of the week they appear, the rival will confess their love to Senpai and the game will be over. The ways of eliminating the rival will eventually range from murder to a much more peaceful matchmaking.

All up, the idea for this game is great. It has its complexities and makes the game have an interesting feel. The idea for a stealth game based in a high school is amazing, it is on par with other steath games, such as Assassins Creed or Hitman. The high school setting makes it very unique, and potentially harder, as the player will be trying to avoid the detection of teachers, students, and most importantly; Senpai. Should you be discovered by any of the aforementioned characters, committing murder, covered in blood, carrying a weapon or visibly insane, you will suffer consequences that more often than not, result in Yandere-chan becoming heartbroken because Senpai noticed her, or apprehended because she was caught, causing Game Over.

osana najimi

Osana Najimi – Planned first rival of the game

The animation in this game so far is smooth and, even though incomplete, fits every action that Yandere-chan is doing. While there are quite obviously many animations missing from the game, what is there already starts to tie the game together.

This game is about being a teenage school girl, stalking her upperclassman trying to sabotage his love life from the shadows to become his girlfriend. YandereDev has stated many times that the whole game will be affected by your decisions. It is not meant to be an easy game, as YandereDev said, it should be very hard to get away with murder, and that is what makes this game interesting.

All up this game has some very good ideas that, if developed properly, will turn into an amazing finished product. YandereDev is doing a good job working on this game, and there it is certain that he will release more great updates for the sandbox build of this game for players to test for bugs.

~Icetail38~

To find out more about Yandere Simulator head here: https://yanderedev.wordpress.com/about/